Tag Archives: professional development

If you’re just joining us…

Posted by: Jon Hurford, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Everyday Monument by Ria Green & Alica Bryson-Haynes Photographed by Nicholas Walton-Healey

Everyday Monument
by Ria Green & Alicia Bryson-Haynes
Photographed by Nicholas Walton-Healey

Joining anything halfway through can be an unsettling experience. Shuffling in late to a movie, a concert or a dinner, probably triggers discomfort in all but the most blithe among us.

But many RMIT programs now have a dedicated midyear intake and many teachers and academics will have taken up appointments in recent days and weeks.

For students, there are midyear orientation events and if you’re wanting to see the kinds of online resources students have access to, here are three handy links:

Whether you’re a staff member or a student joining RMIT this July, you’ll be entering an environment which probably feels already set-up, already up-and-running even with induction and orientation processes.

I’ve been meeting new staff in the School of Art and the College of Design and Social Context and helping them navigate the RMIT landscape as best I can, so I thought I’d use this post to share some tips in the online space. Maybe they’ll spur some more suggestions from readers and commenters?

1. Read RMIT Update. The weekly RMIT Update is an essential mix of what your colleagues want you to know about. Deadlines for grants, upcoming conferences, good news stories and opportunities for staff to contribute to events are what you’ll get here. RMIT Update’s the kind of place where you’d read about RMIT’s involvement in White Night (see Everyday Monument above).

2. Master Gmail. Your RMIT Gmail account means that you’re pretty much committed to Google Apps and its associated bits and pieces. A steep learning curve if you haven’t had a Gmail account before, but worth it for the benefits over traditional email. You’ll receive RMIT Update through your Gmail account.

3. Check out Yammer. If you’re an RMIT staff member then you can see what you think of Yammer, the quickest way to describe it would be a kind of university Facebook. Yammer’s the sort of place you’d go to ask how to unsend something in Gmail.

4. Wrangle your passwords. ESS, eNumbers, CAS, Trobexis, Learning Hub, Gmail, Yammer- welcome a new family of usernames and passwords into your life! And if you work across a number

Click on the image to go to the TIME article on passwords.

Click on the image to go to the TIME article on passwords.

of institutions, as a sessional academic for instance, all of these will be evil twins to the ones you use at your other workplace! What’s the solution to this one? Well the method described in this recent Time article (A phrase like ‘Hi! I’m Doug, and I’m a 35-year-old. Do you want to dance?’ becomes: H!ID,aIa35-y-o.Dywtd?) might be for you…

Otherwise there’s the Self Service Password Reset that can help, or the good people of ITS at the end of extension 58888. There are a number of other numbers that you should know or have in your phone too: 53333 for Security on the Brunswick, Bundoora and City campuses and 53316 for urgent Audio Visual assistance.

Everyday Monument by Ria Green & Alica Bryson-Haynes Photographed by Nicholas Walton-Healey

Everyday Monument
by Ria Green & Alicia Bryson-Haynes
Photographed by Nicholas Walton-Healey

5. And as all online lists about technology should finish with a message to disconnect and get some fresh air, my fifth tip is: Take a walk. Go see some student work, some students at work, or some students playing basketball.

Welcome to RMIT!

Share your thoughts on joining midyear and any tips for new staff and students in the comments!

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Google Apps for Education

Posted by: Howard Errey, Educational Developer, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Last chance registrations for RMIT Staff: A special lunchtime workshop on Blended Learning at RMIT Wednesday, 2 July, 12.30pm, in the Swanston Academic Building featuring Professor Geoffrey Crisp (Dean, Learning and Teaching). Email Rosemary.Chang@rmit.edu.au for details.

During April I had the good fortune to attend the Google Education Summit in Sydney. It was really useful to see the scale and variety of what is going on as well as becoming aware of some of the things on the horizon.

One focus was helping teachers organise and solve problems. There were several sessions on using YouTube for organising, streaming and editing videos. One of the eye openers was seeing how easy the video editor was to use. 67% of courses in the College of Design and Social Context report they are already using YouTube so it will be useful to be able to share more of this functionality. Fortunately, like Blogger and Hangouts (recently switched on at RMIT via Google+), YouTube is on the RMIT roadmap for our suite of apps. You can find out more here.

I saw some excellent work being done with Google Sites, from using it as a low level learning management system, to enabling sharing across different sites and platforms. This seemed particularly useful for teachers needing to structure their online activities with large numbers of students. Many of the sessions were about Add-ons in Google Docs and Google Sheets enabling tools such as Doctopus that can combine with Google Drive and Sites. For example teachers can distribute different documents across different student groups into their Google Drives. I have since been trying out some of the Google Docs add-ons such as EasyBib for adding bibliographic references from the web.

Another session I enjoyed was an informal talk with four Google engineers who talked a lot about their favourite apps and were reassuring about Google wanting to be improving the experience for a number of the issues that we have had (for me it was better organising of shared files). The biggest push however was improving the mobile experience. Already we are seeing this with the apps for Drive and Sheets.

It was also eye-opening to go to a session on Google culture.  Here’s their ‘10 things we know to be true‘, formulated in the company’s first years:

  1. Focus on the user and all else will follow.
  2. It’s best to do one thing really, really well.
  3. Fast is better than slow.
  4. Democracy on the web works.
  5. You don’t need to be at your desk to need an answer.
  6. You can make money without doing evil.
  7. There’s always more information out there.
  8. The need for information crosses all borders.
  9. You can be serious without a suit.
  10. Great just isn’t good enough.

Did you know Google was originally called Backrub? (‘Just let me Backrub that for you…’ rippled around the room.)

The main feature is that Google is led by a ‘nothing is impossible’ attitude. When Google Maps (invented in Australia) was introduced many staff were skeptical as it seemed so far away from their core business. At the same time one of the founders was saying ‘Why not map the oceans or Mars as well?’ Both have become Google projects in the meantime.

A screenshot showing false-colour elevation of Olympus Mons on Mars

A screenshot showing false-colour elevation of Olympus Mons on Mars.

An inspiring keynote was given by Jenny Magiera who works in a Chicago public school where they have recently replaced Apple iPads with Nexus tablets. It takes only a few seconds (versus several hours per iPad) for a teacher to set up each Nexus, as demonstrated by Jenny’s students in the video leading this post. An interesting change of direction given that Jenny is also an Apple Distinguished Educator.

One session I thought was about learning analytics was called Making Sense of Data. It is a free online course Google makes available. The session involved taking us through the course as a way of learning Google’s data tools:

What was really impressive though was the learning design of this short course. Quizzes are offered up front, and then learning exercises are offered if you are not sure of the answers. You can learn about and try some of the course here or do the full course with the Google teachers here.

I also understood for the first time the value of Chromebooks which are essentially browser-based devices with a keyboard and touchscreen. By using the Chrome browser with all the plugin extensions available and combining this with all the capabilities in Google Drive and other Google platforms such as Maps and YouTube, so much can be done purely online.I am beginning to wonder about the value of the Mac I recently bought, compared with a Chromebook which retails for about one fifth of the price.

The next Google Summit is scheduled for Melbourne on 22 – 23 September. It would be terrific if some others from RMIT could benefit from the perspective that attending one of these summits enables. In talking with the organisers they would love to customise a summit for tertiary providers, so I will also be watching that space.

If you want to keep up to date with our project, follow us at www.whatonearth14.wordpress.com. We have a number of new posts showing RMIT teachers and students at work.

Share your thoughts about using Google’s tools in the comments section!

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Twitter: @teachingtomtom and

Teaching Awards: A writing rollercoaster

Ed: With RMIT’s Teaching Awards season underway, this week we welcome a team from the University of Canberra writing on the process of making applications for national citations.

Guest Post: Coralie McCormack, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Canberra.

An expanded version of our rollercoaster ride can be read in ‘Things fall apart so they can fall together’: uncovering the hidden side of writing a teaching award application, McCormack, Vanags and Prior (2014). We offer the expanded narrative (and this quick précis) as a companion to accompany other award applicants and their writing guides on their journey, whatever shape it takes.

Waiting in line (Who we were/still are):

Our rollercoaster ride occurred in 2010 when I was an academic developer within the University of Canberra’s Teaching and Learning Centre. I have a passion for evaluating learning and teaching, developing teaching philosophy statements, teaching portfolios and narrative approaches to teaching and research. I specialise in capacity building for leadership in learning and teaching through institutional and national teaching awards, mentoring programs, writing as a method of inquiry and teaching and learning communities of practice such as TATALs (Talking about teaching and learning). In 2010, I assisted Thea and Robyn with their successful applications for an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning.

ClimbThea was an Assistant Professor in Psychology at the University of Canberra with a fervour for knowledge and understanding, and an ability to use everyday language and examples to explain concepts. These skills and her focus on student feedback enable students to overcome their negative preconceptions of difficult topic areas. She received an ALTC Citation “For using active learning to demystify psychology, inspiring student engagement with the ‘hard, boring’ topics to create exciting learning interactions”.

Robyn was a Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry at the University of Canberra. She uses four main strategies to help students learn: deconstructing complex material using simple explanations, presenting complex processes through animations, illustrating complex molecules through computer simulations and demonstrating complex processes through easy-to-understand drawings. She integrates these with examples that can be applied in everyday life. Robyn received an ALTC Citation “For using ‘step-wise’ knowledge building approaches to help reluctant learners understand and apply complex concepts in difficult biochemistry areas”.

The ride experience:

Meredith Seaman’s post suggests that this type of writing “…does not usually come naturally. It’s hard work and a new style…” We would concur and go as far as to say that writing a UpsidedownCitation application feels like you’re on a rollercoaster where things fall apart before they can come together for submission and success. What we are wondering now, is whether this is something with which others are familiar? Maybe you have ridden the writing rollercoaster as a teaching award applicant. We suspect this rollercoaster is also a ride we take in other writing contexts, such as performance appraisal reports and promotion applications.

The wash-up:

When our ride was finally over we took time to investigate this previously hidden side of writing from an autoethnographic perspective. Our collective story recounts the sense of feeling ‘at home’ as practitioners recognised by our institutions in various ways. However, this was followed by a sense of becoming and being ‘unhomely’ as we gathered speed on the downhill. As time passed and we went through the cycles of re-writes and reflection, our writing gathered momentum and Thea and Robyn began to feel more comfortable in the unfamiliar world of learning and teaching discourse. With this new momentum the we began to enjoy the process, the rollercoaster, we felt a sense of ‘homeliness’. After submission and success we felt a sense of personal transformation through learning and growing ourselves as teachers.

If the stages of ‘homeliness’ and ‘unhomeliness’ identified in our story are replicated in the experiences of others it could reasonably be asked whether the benefits are at least as great as the physical and emotional effort needed to achieve success, particularly for early career academics pressured from all sides to perform as teachers and as researchers.

The inevitably nomadic lives of academics adds a final footnote to all of this. Two years on and our team is now spread across three universities but we’re still able to collaborate electronically (most recently in the HERDSA article and this blog post) and we’re all still engaged in the scholarship of learning and teaching.

But back to where we started, at the title of Meredith Seaman’s contribution: ‘Teaching awards – worth the paperwork?’ And our answer? A definite YES!

For more information:

  • Teachers, academics (and academic developers) might like to visit the resources for the Promoting Excellence Network  hosted at the University of New South Wales.
  • McCormack, C., Prior, R., & Vanags, T. (2014). ‘Things fall apart so they can fall together’: Uncovering the hidden side of writing a teaching award application. Higher Education Research and Development. DOI:10.1080/07294360.2014.890569

Contact:  Coralie.McCormack@canberra.edu.au

Share your thoughts about any aspect of the Teaching Awards process in the comments section!

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Discourse diversity across L&T cultures

This week’s post comes to us via Karen Dellar, Barbara Morgan, Alison Brown and the team at the Study and Learning Centre at RMIT University.

Making the implicit, explicit – discourse structures across cultures

Most students initially find the transition to academic discourse and writing styles challenging. This transition can be more problematic when students are new to the Australian educational environment. Many international students are unfamiliar with lecturers’ expectations and visit the Study and Learning Centre’s busy drop in service for assistance with academic writing.

One student who is now receiving credits and distinctions recently reflected on her previous failure in a number of courses. We asked her what it was that helped her achieve better marks. She said quite simply: ‘I now know what they want!’

Acknowledging diversity – similarities and differences

This student’s experience typifies the challenges often faced by students in not knowing what is expected when they transition to study in a new culture. The first step towards creating a truly inclusive learning environment is to acknowledge the similarities and differences across learning cultures (and there are many) and then to make the differences explicit. Key differences relate to  discourse styles and expectations upon the reader-writer relationships. The way we shape or tell a story depends upon our cultural and linguistic context and the unspoken patterns we have learnt.

Across cultures there are different expectations of how texts are structured. We expect that all texts have a similar framework to our own…until we are faced with something different. It is surprising to realise how much of our knowledge of text organisation is implicit and culturally specific. English language readers have an expectation about how quickly you get to the point, and when you do, how explicitly this is done; the order that concepts are introduced; the amount of preamble or background that is necessary; the amount of repetition that is effective or the extent of digression that is permissible. As teachers we expect our students to conform to these expectations.

In the words of an international student:

In the Subcontinent (Pakistan and India) the way we are taught to structure our essays is, we don’t come to the point directly: we have to develop this major build-up, before coming to the point…otherwise our lecturer won’t think we have put in enough effort…but over here the thing was that ‘bang’ – go to the point directly and then you can start explaining… (Learning Lab International Student Stories)

model1_image

Model 1: Direct, linear approach. Here’s the flower. These are the main points…

Assignment structure is culturally specific

It is often assumed that students whose first language is not English have difficulty with their

Model 2. Here's the garden. Let me take you for a walk and I'll show you something..

Model 2: Explanation before getting to the main point. Here’s the garden. Let me take you for a walk and I’ll show you something…

studies because of their language. This is not the full picture. What is commonly overlooked is that students from different cultural backgrounds are often unaware of the academic expectations of their new educational culture. In particular, the discourse structure can be unfamiliar and different to what they know.

The models here give a visual representation of two common ways of structuring academic writing across cultures.

Model 1 is a simple representation of the approach to organising material in the Australian educational context. The student is expected to present the main point first, followed by explanation and analysis.

Model 2 is another representation of what is common in many other cultures. In this model the student builds a case through background information, explanation and analysis and finally presents the main point.

Put simply, the measures for ‘good writing’ in an Australian university are often quite different from the students’ previous experience. International students are often disappointed at their poor marks in first year as they take some time to work out what is required. In the case above, the student repeated first year having learnt this lesson the hard way. A better solution would be for students to be explicitly taught what is expected and for it to be acknowledged that their understanding of academic writing on arrival may be different to what we expect.

For more on helping your students structure their assignments visit RMIT’s Learning Lab. For diverse cohorts a good starting point is International Student Stories. As well, you will find resources on assignment genres that you can use in-class and direct students to for self-study.

References:

Arkoudis, S & Tran, L 2010, ‘Writing Blah, Blah, Blah: Lecturers’ Approaches and Challenges in Supporting International Students’, International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 169 -178.
Fox, H 1994, ‘Listening to the World. Cultural Issues in Academic Writing ‘, National Council of Teachers of English, USA.
Ramburuth, P 2009, ‘The impact of culture on learning: exploring student perceptions’, Multicultural Education and Technology Journal, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 182 – 195.
Ryan J & Carroll J (eds) 2005, Teaching International Students: Improving Learning for All, Routledge, London.

Share your thoughts about discourse diversity and your tips for conveying your expectations in the comments section!

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Being bold, being true – Knowing what you’re best to do

Guest Post: Associate Professor Debra Bateman, Faculty of Arts & Education, School of Education, Deakin University.

Late last year, as a guest of Dean of the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies (GUSS) Professor David Hayward and as part of an LTIF project on Next Generation Learning Spaces, Associate Professor Debra Bateman spoke to teachers and lecturers at RMIT about her own teaching identity and journey as an academic with a Q&A. The project team was keen to capture some of her thoughts and share them with a wider audience. In this post Deb outlines a few of the principles that underpin her teaching. The session was extremely well-received with many survey responses mentioning that Deb’s words energised and affirmed what these lecturers and teachers were doing in their teaching. 

We hope this post can have a similar effect on you at this busy time of the year!

Being bold, being true – Knowing what you’re best to do
(or my thoughts on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education)
 
SuperheroesThe best teachers in higher education are the ones who know what they are doing. Of course, that sounds quite simple, however to know what one is doing, in this context, is complex. You need to be able to juggle multiple pedagogical and curriculum balls in the air at any time, including:

·      Disciplinary knowledge.

·      The broken up bits of that disciplinary knowledge that are accessible to everyone, and subsequently scaffold deeper learning.

·      An approach that not only engages students, but also professionally and intellectually engages oneself, in order to participate in the learning process in a meaningful way.

·      Confidence in one’s academic identity.

·      An ability to articulate, from another different disciplinary knowledge such as education, the reasons you are doing what you are doing and how you are doing it. (Did you know, by the way, that in higher education we should be talking about andragogy rather than pedagogy?)

·      Opportunities to witness, assess and evaluate what is learned, and to make judgments about learning that affect how students are able to enter the world.

In my presentation at RMIT, I suggested that higher education teachers need to know themselves, and situated that idea in the works of Pat Thomson (2002) who talks about the ideas of virtual schoolbags. Whilst she was referring to the ‘stuff’ that students bring into a learning environment, which influence how and what they do, I suggest that teachers carry virtual school bags also. On top of the content they are expected to teach, they bring loads of experiences of the world and sophisticated thinking which ought to capitalise on the connections that are able to be made for students when delivering big ideas or abstract concepts. 

The fact that before I was a teacher and academic, I was a hairdresser might account for some of the very creative endeavours I pursue in teaching and learning. My background as a teacher in some challenging schools offers me a diverse set of strategies for engagement of resistant learners (and sometimes colleagues). Working to our strengths, offers students of all pursuits an enthused and committed experience in their learning.

I’m also pretty interested in Shulman’s notion of pedagogies of uncertainty (2005) and Rowan and Beavis’ notion of ‘playful pedagogies’ (never published but I heard them say it first). The idea of enabling students to take risks in their learning is powerful, and more importantly  exciting.

For different programs of studies, ‘risks’ can look quite different. In one of my classes, when teaching Civics and Citizenship, I ask students to come dressed as superheroes, and through a range of life-world related experiences they undertake a deep critical analysis of many of the taken-for-granted constructs of the caped wonders (though we also critique the capes from an OH&S perspective). The risks are many, including exposing a value or position of a societal issue, feeling like a fool as people stare at you on public transport (if you don’t do a quick change in a telephone booth), and participating in an embodied analysis, which draws upon cultural knowledge. However, the excitement provides the titillation to learn.

I’ve also thought a lot about ‘furtive teaching’. That’s taking risks with new strategies or using strategies in ways other than they were intended, with the fear of being caught. Part of furtive teaching is undertaking the act of teaching knowing that the risk is countered by the amount of preparation, consideration, research or rehearsal that you have done. In my experience, students have loved being part of my risks. And increasingly, other staff are enjoying them too. One staff-related risk was our representation of scholarship materials Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 11.54.00 amthrough a blend of culture jam, flash mob or parody (see https://vimeo.com/38401190).

Be proud of who you are, and where you come from. Connect the who you are with the what you need to do. Teaching and learning are important aspects of higher education, which cannot be guided by a proliferation of best practice guides. Whilst scholarship can inform and enhance what it is that we do, what we do is part of who we are, what we know, and how we know. But, in a climate of increased accountability, be able to articulate all of those things, and more importantly publish them. Give licence to others to explore their teaching and learning perspectives in ways that up until now, have been fairly limited and narrow.

References:

Shulman, L. S. (2005). Pedagogies of uncertainty. Liberal Education, 91(2), 18-26.
Thomson, P. (2002). Schooling the Rustbelt Kids. Making the Difference in Changing Times. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Deb tweets @debbateman
Share your thoughts about pedagogies and andragogies  in the comments section!
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Teaching Excellence in Next Generation Learning Spaces

Posted by: Dr Cathy Hall-Van Den Elsen, Manager, Academic Development Group, College of Business
& Thembi Mason, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

SABMany of the learning and teaching spaces available at RMIT University are now fitted with innovative technologies and specialised furniture to support teaching approaches that foster collaboration, engagement and student-centred learning.

These spaces have opened up a diverse range of teaching and learning possibilities, offering unprecedented opportunities for collaborative learning and student interaction underpinned by the latest educational technologies, including the extended use of mobile devices.

As part of a Learning and Teaching Investment Fund project, the Business Academic Development Group has collected and produced a number of case studies and videos of academic and teaching staff discussing their teaching in the Swanston Academic Building (SAB) and how they have responded to the potential the new learning spaces provide.

Each case study describes teaching strategies that have challenged, stimulated and motivated students through a combination of room types, pedagogies and technology to create student-centred learning events, including opportunities for integrating students’ mobile technologies in the classroom environment.

The video series is designed to support academic staff who are looking for information about learning spaces generally, and particularly in these new spaces at RMIT. Five types of learning spaces are presented from two perspectives:

  • Animations which describe the affordances of each the spaces.

  • Video interviews and demonstrations by five experienced teachers, supported by student observations about their engagement with the spaces.

For example, Jason Downs discusses his teaching strategies in the ‘Project Spaces’ in the SAB such as mixing and matching technology to suit particular tasks and how he enables collaboration. He found that students valued learning in these spaces with opportunities to work easily in a team, presenting their work through collaborative software and receiving feedback from other students.

In another example, 2013 RMIT Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award winner, Dr Ingo Karpen, discusses his use of the discursive theatre to facilitate student discussions of complex theoretical material and case studies.

If you would like to find out how other academics are using these new learning spaces then read the case studies and watch the videos.

Leave a comment and let us know how you find teaching in these spaces too!

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Peer Partnerships: the professional development program that really resonates

Posted by:

Angela Clarke, Senior Research Fellow,
A/Prof Andrea Chester, Acting Deputy Pro Vice-Chancellor, Learning and Teaching
&
Dallas Wingrove, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching, Property, Construction and Project Management, 
College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Rebekha Naim and Shayna Quinn are peer partners from the School of Media and Communication.

Rebekha Naim and Shayna Quinn are peer partners from the School of Media and Communication.

The RMIT Peer Partnerships program has been running for two years. Over that time the program has been successfully implemented in 17 Schools/centres and units across campuses in Australia and Vietnam. There have been over 195 peer partners and 24 leaders who have participated. The response from academic staff has been overwhelmingly positive, as evidenced by the following comments:

*One of the most positive and enriching professional development experiences I have had in nearly ten years at RMIT. 

*Best PD ever! To be great, you have to want to be great, there is always room for improvement as an academic…this is a great structure for reflective practice in teaching and learning.

*Very positive and insightful. Helped me conceive and expand possibilities for my own teaching practice. Sparked new ideas.

*This was a valuable program, which fostered teaching skills in ways both practical and theoretical.

*I found peer partnerships to be a really effective way of learning and reflecting on practice. It was particularly rewarding as a sessional teacher as many other opportunities aren’t open to us so it made me feel part of the RMIT team – for possibly the first time – which is really important to me.

These responses from our teaching staff suggest that the RMIT Peer Partnerships program is truly resonating with our staff and is having a positive impact. This is due to many factors including the structure of the program and the underpinning principles which foreground voluntary participation, reciprocal exchange and confidentiality. Many academics feel that this program is filling a professional gap in their academic work.  The process, which focuses on reciprocal observation of teaching practice, has generated meaningful professional conversations about teaching and learning and is fostering collegiate communities of practice within Schools/units.  For some staff who are seeking promotion or a teaching award, Peer Partnerships have offered a safe way in to the experience of peer observation and feedback for continuous improvement.

The program is open to all academic teaching staff, including sessionals and caters for early, mid and experienced professional development needs. The program has been specifically devised for implementation within the local context of a School.

We are now in our third year of implementation. This year we are very pleased to announce that two College representatives will co lead Peer Partnerships with us: Laurine Hurley in the College of Science, Engineering & Health and Tom Palaskas in the College of Business. We would like to welcome anyone who is interested in Peer Partnerships to contact dallas.wingrove@rmit.edu.au or angela.clarke@rmit.edu.au.

For further information visit our website www.rmit.edu.au/teaching/peerpartnerships.

Share your thoughts and questions in the comments section!
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Planning learning design through storyboards

Guest Post: Professor Gilly Salmon, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Learning Transformations, Swinburne University of Technology. 

Professor Gilly Salmon is one of the world’s leading thinkers in online learning. She researches and publishes widely on the themes of innovation and change in Higher Education and the exploitation of new technologies of all kinds in the service of learning. The Learning Transformations Unit is responsible for the exploration and exploitation of learning technologies; the resourcing, preparation and scholarship of staff; and the development of partnerships that increase and extend Swinburne’s online provision and presence. This year Gilly will be a guest speaker at the upcoming DEANZ Conference and EduTECH National Congress & Expo.

Gilly tweets @gillysalmon.

Opens in a new window.

Click to see the details of Gilly’s latest book: ‘E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, 2nd Edition’

Late last year I was invited to speak to academics at RMIT and we had a great afternoon together working on ideas around building scaffolds for learning using newer technologies.

Of course the time we had together  went by too quickly!  When I looked at the feedback, I noticed several participants had commented that they liked the idea of storyboarding for planning learning and wanted to know more about it. From the Learning Transformation Unit at Swinburne, we’re in the middle of running a MOOC for professional development around the Carpe Diem process.

I’ve made a series of little videos for the MOOC and one is about storyboarding — essentially representing the sequence or journey of your learners through the time you have together — and how helpful I’ve found it for planning forward-looking learning and teaching. So it’s here for you to have a look at and maybe get together with a course or program team and try!

For me, the focus on learning design is a key shift in the way we need to consider creating the future in our various disciplines and domains.

I would be interested to know how it goes for you.

Best wishes,

Gilly

Share your thoughts about learning design in the comments section!

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What will the campus of the future look like?

Guest Post: Jo Dane is a designer, educator and researcher with a passion for educational transformation enabled through research-based design practice. Jo works at woodsbagot.com and tweets @WB_JoDane.

Jo_Dane_Twitter_PicI’m a design educator and someone who’s regularly tasked with putting together a vision of physical spaces for students. Ideally, these new spaces are supposed to be ‘future-proof’. So it can be fun to do some crystal-gazing about the future of the university campus.

Here are some observations, speculations and predictions that I’ll commit to the blogosphere in 2014:

1. Students will be empowered with choices of how, when and where to learn.
It will be increasingly possible to get a degree at University X which includes undertaking core subjects at University Y or via accredited MOOCs. If the quality of the learning experience (and facilities and spaces will be part of that equation) doesn’t stack up, students will shift their allegiance to another institution. And the funding will follow the student.

2. Hybrid learning experiences will be the new norm.
On-campus delivery will increasingly incorporate online components such as response software in lectures, multimedia content, group collaboration and teacher consultation. Digital platforms will continue to improve and enable both synchronous and asynchronous learning encounters.

3. Learning will be social and happen with other students IN REAL TIME.
For too long learning has happened in isolation in students’ homes while studying for exams, or preparing essays and assignment work. It has long been recognised that learning is a social experience. A room full of students is also a room full of teachers. Interaction between students broadens each student’s perspective and provides an opportunity to share and reinforce important concepts.

Click to see more pictures of MUSE, a Woods Bagot project completed this year.

MUSE – Macquarie University Spatial Experience, Sydney, 2014

Real time learning will happen in the classroom when a) the teacher facilitates the interactive learning experience and b) the classroom is designed to enable such encounters.

4. The notion of a 24-7, ‘sticky campus’ will endure.
Students (especially undergraduates) will be encouraged to stay on campus for longer periods of time. They will continue to blur boundaries between learning, socialising and working. The campus, therefore, will provide ‘sticky’ spaces where students can undertake both serendipitous and asynchronous activities. These will include media hubs for small groups to collectively engage in online material, or to Skype subject experts/overseas peers.

Click to see more pictures of MUSE, a Woods Bagot project completed this year.

MUSE – Macquarie University Spatial Experience, Sydney, 2014

5. Mobile devices, ‘Bring Your Own Device’ and cloud computing mean that students can access specialist software anywhere, anytime.
Students need no longer be tethered to the dehumanising lab computer, but can choose where and with whom to study, whilst accessing critical digital infrastructure.

6. Say goodbye to lecture theatres and computer labs!
While this might seem to counter to the ‘sticky campus’ idea (but really it should clarify the purpose of bringing students together) students are voting with their feet and where possible opting to tune into lectures online rather than face-to-face. Not only this, the prevalence of high quality (free) content, through YouTube, TED Talks, MOOCs and a plethora of other online repositories means that students are finding expert content from alternative sources rather than from the prescribed teachers. Universities will increasingly share exemplary content rather than rely on academics reinventing content every year.

7. Augmented learning, wearable technologies, 3d printing and gaming experiences are coming.
These are recognised trends on the horizon. We might not know exactly what they will look like, nor the impact they will have on the campus environment. Get used to this feeling. The better you adapt to change, uncertainty and the unforeseeable, the more agile you are. Agility is a key trait needed for the emerging knowledge economy.

Screen Shot 2014-03-16 at 5.16.10 pm

Media & Communication staff at RMIT discuss learning spaces in the Swanston Academic Building.

8. Academics will work increasingly in teams, sharing and collaborating in teaching and research activities.
The academic workplace will need to provide for a younger generation of academics who are more collaborative and connected than any previous generation. The next generation of academics won’t be hidden away in confined offices. The campus will include ‘third spaces’ — extensions of the workplace where workers can seek alternative environments to promote innovation and problem-solving.

9. Academics will be more accessible to students, but will connect through digital means moreso than face-to-face.
For teachers and lecturers, the skills of delivering remotely and facilitating online discussions will be as crucial as your in-class toolkit. This means your potential reach increases (and so does your profile) but of course that there’s another set of skills that are currently seen as optional.

10. This one’s a fill-in-the-blank, left for you, the reader…
Posts like this can often live on through the comments thread — why not make your own prediction (or disagree with/clarify one of my own) by commenting below.

Share your thoughts and predictions in the comments section!
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First impressions

Posted by: Jon Hurford, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching & Andrea Wallace, Educational Developer, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Andrea is a member of the Inclusive Teaching and Assessment Practices Project working to develop resources and deliver professional development to staff.

Sign in a school bus reads: 'Keep Out. Please put on seatbelt + be quiet + behave. Thanks'

A sign in a school’s excursion bus at the Old Melbourne Gaol this week.

As the saying goes, ‘You don’t get a second chance at a first impression.’

This week, across Australia, thousands of lecturers and tutors will be meeting their new students or welcoming back continuing students.

In Vocational Education, classes have been back for almost a month, but still, it’s early days.

It’s obvious that getting off on the right foot and creating the right environment for students has a special importance in tertiary education. For one thing, in a 12-16 week delivery schedule, the feeling that time is precious is understandable.

In wanting students to take our course seriously, in the feeling that we’re competing for the mindshare of their course load, in rushing about, is there a risk of putting up a sign (metaphorically) like the bus driver (or the staff who share driving duties) in the picture to the left? Note the ‘Keep Out’ in red and the tiny ‘Thanks’ at the right. What messages are we sending students in their first classes?

So this post is just a quick reminder that in the midst of all the organisational and administrative tasks we should still hold our personal philosophy of education front-and-centre and be enacting the strategies and principles that brought us through university as learners, and that brought us to university to teach.

The Inclusive Teaching and Assessment Practices Project has a set of principles that might help you see that big picture (or the jigsaw pieces of the bigger picture that are your courses) and we can’t think of a better time of the year (at least for our southern hemisphere audience) than now to put them in front of readers. Each of the following links has an associated page with key questions, resources and examples of the principle in use:

Getting a piece of writing from your students in a class early in your teaching schedule is an easy diagnostic tool. You’ll get to know a key aspect of their learning skill set and coupled with a quick survey you can get an impression of what your students expect from the course. Perhaps you teach online (or you’ve taken these elements of your course online) and you use a discussion board or blog for this. You can probably see how this simple task hits many of the principles above– if you’ve asked students what was their inspiration to study a certain discipline; if you’ve read the responses and turned them around to the students quickly; if you’ve then provided the means for them to share their responses and maybe organise themselves in study groups based on this for the first assessment, you’re establishing an environment that is ‘feedback rich’.

But what about longer pieces of writing? What about supporting your students in documenting their progress in your course?

Next week, there’s an opportunity for all staff at RMIT as Associate Professor Mary Ryan (School of Education, QUT) delivers a lecture and workshop on the Teaching and Assessing Reflective Learning (TARL) model that she and her team developed in a recent OLT project.

Professor Ryan will explain how the systematic approach can be used to embed the pedagogy of reflective writing across courses in different disciplines.  The workshop will explore the suite of pedagogical patterns and accompanying resources for systematically teaching and assessing reflective practice underpinned by the TARL and EPC models.

Lecture: Teaching and Assessing Reflective Writing
Thursday 13 March 2014
11.30 am – 12.30 pm
Building 80, Level 1, Room 2
Workshops: Teaching and Assessing Reflective Writing
Thursday 13 March 2014
12.30 – 2.20 pm
Building 13, Level 3, Room 5 (City)
Or
Friday 14 March 2014
11.00 am – 12.30 pm
Building 514, Level 1, Room 2 (Brunswick)

Registration for the workshops is essential. Space is limited. Click here to register (RMIT Login required).

Oh, and on the topic of first impressions, we’d also like to mention two blogs that have made good impressions on us during the break and will be of particular interest to casual, sessional and part time staff:

We recently added them to our blogroll (right of screen)– go visit their site for more perspectives on starting the year.

Share your thoughts on first impressions, inclusive teaching and reflective writing in the comments section!
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