Category Archives: Offshore teaching

The unbundling of higher education: Breaking down the whole.

(cc) Flickr user: Mike Linksvayer

(cc) Flickr user: Mike Linksvayer

Posted by: Erika Beljaars-Harris, Educational Developer, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

There’s another movement unfolding in the background of fee deregulation that we need to be aware of: the unbundling of higher education. As Professor Jim Barber (former Vice Chancellor, University of New England) explains, “The concept of ‘unbundled’ education refers to the emergent practice of allowing students to pay for those services, and only those services, that they actually require.” Similar thoughts are being raised in the UK, as this Times Higher Education article points to a report that recommends government funding follow the student and not the institution.

Think of it as the difference between a set menu (preselected courses served at a fixed time and price) compared to free choice from the menu and dishes from any other restaurant. In the higher education arena, this might mean choosing a course from a university, but not paying for the facilities and services offered. The facilities students may choose to not use include the cafeteria and other academic and support services. What’s being called a ‘pick-and-mix’ approach means that students pay for certain facilities on a fee-for-service basis. Which leads to student choosing which parts they want to use and therefore pay for. Choice has always been seen as something students value in a program of study (look at electives, streams, majors, study-abroad and cross-institutional studies for instance) but this movement might see multi-institution degrees become a path that more students select.

According to Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, the unbundling of higher education is a form of ‘disruptive innovation‘. Christensen explains it as “a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of the market and then relentlessly moves upmarket, eventually displacing established competitors.”  An example of this already exists in the form of consumers (students) having the ability to receive credentials via RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning) through previous work experience or a MOOC. For universities, the unbundling of higher education is a form of disruptive innovation. It is enabling the consumer (student) with the ability to choose subjects and courses from a university that can be delivered on campus, online or both, without the added fees for services and facilities that they may not need nor use. As a consumer (student), this unbundling provides the ability to secure services the individual does want, and not pay for what they don’t want. This hopefully translates to cheaper, but just as, or more effective degrees and experiences selected from a wider pool of providers.

The movement towards unbundling has started. Georgia Institute of Technology is admitting students into a low-fee postgraduate degree. Students are taking courses from the University Without Walls, a university fully supported by the University of Massachusetts, that enables students to design their program of study.

The goals of unbundling of higher education are to increase the quality of lectures, enable more individualised instruction, offer an increase in choice to students and most importantly, provide it all at a lower cost. What it might mean for academics and universities is to take stock of what they deliver well online, in blended environments and on-campus: student expectations aren’t going to do anything except rise.

To be honest, I Iike this movement, I like the goals that this movement professes to be aligning towards. I will be watching those universities to see who gets it right (and wrong) in this evolution of higher education.

Share your thoughts on unbundling in the comments…

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Learning & teaching for sustainability– naturally

Guest Post: Dr Jude Westrup, Senior Advisor, Strategic Initiatives, RMIT University.

Click the image to view The Learning and Teaching for Sustainability toolkit [PDF, 812 KB, 27 pages]

Click the image to view The Learning and Teaching for Sustainability toolkit [PDF, 812 KB, 27 pages]

Following Margaret Blackburn’s post in early 2013, I responded in a comment that it was ‘…great to see sustainability and environmental responsibility made explicit in our graduate attributes…’ What this means is that whatever the program of study, graduates of RMIT University will have engaged in processes to develop their abilities to recognise environmental and social impacts and to provide leadership on sustainable approaches to complex problems. The page on the graduate attribute Environmentally aware and responsible (#3 of 6) gives some suggestions of how this might look in a program. Appropriate to their level of study, students will:
•                Recognise the interrelationship between environmental, social and economic sustainability
•                Appraise and critique context-appropriate sustainability measures
•                Take responsibility for critical decision-making in ensuring sustainable outcomes
•                Appropriately apply their environmental and sustainability literacy in a highly diverse range of contexts.
For interested teachers and academics (especially those involved in course and program reviews, amendments or developments) the Learning and Teaching for Sustainability (LTfS) project can help you map this attribute and there are many excellent curriculum development and refreshment resources already available on the LTfS website  and includes the recently produced LTfS Toolkit for curriculum development, consisting of templates and workshop activity sheets.
Sustainability is undergoing a renaissance within the international and national tertiary sector as it relates to professional, industry and community priorities. Several LTfS components of RMIT’s Sustainability Action Plan are being reinvigorated while others are being developed for the first time. Through the Office of the Dean – Learning & Teaching (Academic Portfolio) a university-wide, year-long LTfS project is flourishing, with curriculum development, professional development (PD) and LTfS opportunities for staff being the main foci.
In terms of PD, staff will be able to access resources for LTfS curriculum development and evaluation via the LTfS website, a Google Site for informal (within RMIT) sharing of ideas, the Sustainability Subject Guide (RMIT Library) and other resources collated within RMIT’s Learning Repository.

Gallery of RMIT Graphs

LTfS sits within a broader suite of sustainability projects at RMIT.

RMIT Vietnam already has sustainability resources, such as an Environmental Policy in place.

We have contributed to the International Sustainability Literacy Index (currently in development), the United Nations Higher Education for Sustainable Development portal and the National Education for Sustainability (Office of Learning & Teaching) website. RMIT is a key contributor to these sites and initiatives.The national Education for Sustainability Tertiary Forum was held at LaTrobe University in February which linked staff at Universities in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania. Detailed outcomes and actions are available on the Education for Sustainability website.

We have ongoing national participation with groups such as ACTS (Australasian Campuses Toward Sustainability) and AAEE (Australian Association for Environmental Education). Both of these groups have conferences in Hobart in November which staff are encouraged to explore, attend and contribute to.
A range of RMIT resources exist for teachers, lecturers and academic developers.

A range of RMIT resources exist for teachers, lecturers and academic developers. Click on the image to see more.

All Colleges in Melbourne and the Sustainability Group in Vietnam are involved in linking LTfS curriculum development with the Global Learning by Design (2014-2016) major project and other strategic Program and Course development and delivery initiatives (such as the AQF Program and Course Guide alignments and Undergraduate and Postgraduate Program reviews). A workshop, Introduction to Learning & Teaching for Sustainability will be available to all staff from Semester 2 in the DevelopMe PD program and online, modular resources are under development. Social media, digital learning and blog communications channels are also being explored and developed.During the RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo in September 2014 students, alumni and staff from across RMIT will present an interactive Q&A style LTfS colloquium. This session will explore key issues in sustainability of relevance to staff and students across our campuses.

The creation of a dedicated RMIT Teaching Award (P9: Graduate Learning Outcomes), for curriculum developments or initiatives that enhance one of RMIT’s graduate attributes, will further raise the profile of LTfS and enhance learning and teaching practices across RMIT.

To close on the topic of awards, the 2014 Green Gown Awards Australasia is now open and the deadline for all submissions is 4pm Tuesday 5 August 2014. A team in Landscape Architecture were finalists last year with their project looking at green roof projects.
Are there teams out there ready to have a shot at the 2014 awards?
Share your thoughts and questions about sustainability on campus in the comments section!
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Patterns for Change and Innovation

Posted by: Spiros Soulis, Senior Advisor, Learning & Teaching, RMIT University.

Click on the image to visit the GLbD site.

Click on the image to visit the GLbD site.

RMIT is a global university of technology and design but how does this translate into our programs and courses? Are they truly global? And are we keeping pace with the changes being forced upon Higher Education?  Changes that are very much driven by technology and online delivery.

Global Learning by Design (GLbD) is a major project of the University that is hoping to address and deliver on these questions. The idea is that programs will be designed for delivery in multiple locations using multiple channels: face-to-face, blended or fully-online.

So how does GLbD propose to do this?  We’ve set up Curriculum Design Teams made up of academic and teaching leads, teaching staff, educational developers, representatives from the Library and Study and Learning Centre as well as production specialists from the Office of the Dean, Learning & Teaching. It’s about bringing these stakeholders together from the start, providing a holistic approach to program development. Not a new concept in designing curriculum, but one that makes sense.

There are many innovative approaches to teaching and learning across RMIT that have resulted in rich student learning experiences. But what we have not been able to do is consistently capture this work and share it! Making it available to other disciplines and Colleges is how this good work can have a ripple effect. GLbD is putting its effort into capturing Curriculum Design Patterns and building a repository for all to access and use.

Avoiding a business-as-usual approach, we’re using particular principles of program management methodologies such as Agile and Lean. These principles have been around for a long time and are now becoming more commonplace in Higher Education.

Information on Global Learning by Design can be found here along with a list of all the Colleges’ projects for 2014. If you are interested in how you could get involved in GLbD, contact your Deputy Head/Dean Learning & Teaching. We’ll be posting an update on the work from specific Curriculum Design Teams later in the year.

Share your thoughts and questions about the project  in the comments section!
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Discourse diversity across L&T cultures

This week’s post comes to us via Karen Dellar, Barbara Morgan, Alison Brown and the team at the Study and Learning Centre at RMIT University.

Making the implicit, explicit – discourse structures across cultures

Most students initially find the transition to academic discourse and writing styles challenging. This transition can be more problematic when students are new to the Australian educational environment. Many international students are unfamiliar with lecturers’ expectations and visit the Study and Learning Centre’s busy drop in service for assistance with academic writing.

One student who is now receiving credits and distinctions recently reflected on her previous failure in a number of courses. We asked her what it was that helped her achieve better marks. She said quite simply: ‘I now know what they want!’

Acknowledging diversity – similarities and differences

This student’s experience typifies the challenges often faced by students in not knowing what is expected when they transition to study in a new culture. The first step towards creating a truly inclusive learning environment is to acknowledge the similarities and differences across learning cultures (and there are many) and then to make the differences explicit. Key differences relate to  discourse styles and expectations upon the reader-writer relationships. The way we shape or tell a story depends upon our cultural and linguistic context and the unspoken patterns we have learnt.

Across cultures there are different expectations of how texts are structured. We expect that all texts have a similar framework to our own…until we are faced with something different. It is surprising to realise how much of our knowledge of text organisation is implicit and culturally specific. English language readers have an expectation about how quickly you get to the point, and when you do, how explicitly this is done; the order that concepts are introduced; the amount of preamble or background that is necessary; the amount of repetition that is effective or the extent of digression that is permissible. As teachers we expect our students to conform to these expectations.

In the words of an international student:

In the Subcontinent (Pakistan and India) the way we are taught to structure our essays is, we don’t come to the point directly: we have to develop this major build-up, before coming to the point…otherwise our lecturer won’t think we have put in enough effort…but over here the thing was that ‘bang’ – go to the point directly and then you can start explaining… (Learning Lab International Student Stories)

model1_image

Model 1: Direct, linear approach. Here’s the flower. These are the main points…

Assignment structure is culturally specific

It is often assumed that students whose first language is not English have difficulty with their

Model 2. Here's the garden. Let me take you for a walk and I'll show you something..

Model 2: Explanation before getting to the main point. Here’s the garden. Let me take you for a walk and I’ll show you something…

studies because of their language. This is not the full picture. What is commonly overlooked is that students from different cultural backgrounds are often unaware of the academic expectations of their new educational culture. In particular, the discourse structure can be unfamiliar and different to what they know.

The models here give a visual representation of two common ways of structuring academic writing across cultures.

Model 1 is a simple representation of the approach to organising material in the Australian educational context. The student is expected to present the main point first, followed by explanation and analysis.

Model 2 is another representation of what is common in many other cultures. In this model the student builds a case through background information, explanation and analysis and finally presents the main point.

Put simply, the measures for ‘good writing’ in an Australian university are often quite different from the students’ previous experience. International students are often disappointed at their poor marks in first year as they take some time to work out what is required. In the case above, the student repeated first year having learnt this lesson the hard way. A better solution would be for students to be explicitly taught what is expected and for it to be acknowledged that their understanding of academic writing on arrival may be different to what we expect.

For more on helping your students structure their assignments visit RMIT’s Learning Lab. For diverse cohorts a good starting point is International Student Stories. As well, you will find resources on assignment genres that you can use in-class and direct students to for self-study.

References:

Arkoudis, S & Tran, L 2010, ‘Writing Blah, Blah, Blah: Lecturers’ Approaches and Challenges in Supporting International Students’, International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 169 -178.
Fox, H 1994, ‘Listening to the World. Cultural Issues in Academic Writing ‘, National Council of Teachers of English, USA.
Ramburuth, P 2009, ‘The impact of culture on learning: exploring student perceptions’, Multicultural Education and Technology Journal, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 182 – 195.
Ryan J & Carroll J (eds) 2005, Teaching International Students: Improving Learning for All, Routledge, London.

Share your thoughts about discourse diversity and your tips for conveying your expectations in the comments section!

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RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo 2013

Guest post: Penny Mercer, Project Advisor, Learning and Teaching Unit, RMIT University.

Click to open the RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo 2013 page.

The Learning and Teaching Expo is an opportunity to showcase the excellent work of our dedicated teaching staff. It is a time for all of us to reflect on how we might enhance the student experience, reimagine our teaching and network with colleagues.

This year’s Expo takes the theme of “Inspiring teaching, inspiring learning.” Come along and hear what your colleagues have done to improve student learning outcomes, bring along your own experiences, or questions for discussion time. The Expo eLearning journey will allow all staff to identify a point of interest from which further learning opportunities can be explored.

Come along and hear from our invited keynote speakers about what is happening in the tertiary education sector, hear what your colleagues have done to improve student learning outcomes and bring along your own experiences or questions for discussion time.

Day 1: Tuesday 3 September – 12pm to 4.30pm, with lunch from 1pm to 2pm
Day 2: Wednesday 4 September – 9am to 1pm, with lunch from 1pm to 2pm
Venue: Design Hub, City campus.

Click here (or on the image above) to see the 2013 program and register now to attend (RMIT login required).

We look forward to seeing you there!

Wherever you go, there you are

Posted by: Ruth Moeller, Lecturer in Education and Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Every time I pass the billboard for a certain university advertising an overseas student experience involving elephants, I get irritated. I don’t have anything against students, the university or elephants for that matter but really, how many students will actually go overseas as part of their studies? Although I agree that it would be a wonderful learning experience, I have difficulty with the premise that, for a student to be a global citizen, they need to study abroad.

Don’t get me wrong, ‘They’ say that travel broadens the mind and ‘They’ are right. The opportunity to work or study offshore would enhance any student experience and a highlight of a student’s experience at university.

But in my opinion this should be the icing on the cake, not the main focus. ‘I went overseas, now I am global’ — I don’t think so. So to do justice to the idea of global competence, we need to think more broadly.

RMIT has a sophisticated view when it says graduates will be ‘Global in outlook and competence‘. What that commits us to is providing graduates with ‘…opportunities to acquire professional [and] cultural skills that enable them to engage thoughtfully and effectively with the great diversity of people and situations they encounter at work and socially.’

This is saying that there are personal and professional skills and knowledge that need to be developed in all of our students. As educators, we need to ask: ‘How do we do this?’

As a starting point, the question I think we need to ask is: What does an ‘internationalised’ student look like in my discipline? How can we claim our students will be global in outlook and competence if we don’t actually know what this means within our discipline?

I have tried to do this in my discipline, tertiary teaching. Using the Australian Qualifications Framework criteria of knowledge, skills and application of knowledge and skills, I started by imaging what I would expect if someone came to me for a teaching job claiming that they were ‘global’. What would I be looking for? In doing, this I developed a framework of the knowledge and skills that helps students develop their global competence and outlook.

Some of the knowledge I would expect includes an appreciation of educational philosophies and different education systems to get a sense of the expectations of their students and how these philosophies might be enacted in classes. An added benefit of this could be the help it gives them in finding employment opportunities and navigating the various educational systems that operate across the world. Also of importance would be knowledge of the cultural views of education; the role of student/teacher, group/individual in different contexts.

When thinking of skills I would include a proficiency with different teaching strategies and the use of technology to engage diverse learning styles and cultures as well as the ability to research resources in an international context. The skills that help them identify what is available for them in regards to enhancing and internationalising their curriculum are, as educators, the same ones that will help them localise their curriculum should they wish to deliver content offshore or to deliver at a distance to global learners.

In thinking about the application of knowledge and skills, on a practical level I would incorporate how to design assessment for diverse learners and contexts, as well as the strategies that they, as teachers, could use to make their students ‘globally aware’.

In a broader sense, I would expect that person to be able to listen to, appreciate and synthesise other points of view as perhaps the key ability to operate within diverse cultures and environments.

Now the question is, does this just happen? Or do I need to create learning opportunities for this? Miracles do happen, but usually student learning is based on hard work and good design and that is what I am going for.

As my course is being reviewed, I am currently working on ways to integrate the skills and knowledge required to allow my students to have a global outlook. I found an excellent set of resources The GIHE Good Practice Guide to Internationalising the Curriculum at Griffith University to help with the planning involved in internationalising a course. They encourage you to look at programs and courses holistically, integrating an internationalised approach into aspects of curriculum design, assessment, learning resources and extracurricular activities.

Being global in outlook and competence requires far more than boarding a plane. Recently on the blog (here  and here) we’ve showcased student mobility opportunities that focus on the learner and their discipline. Thinking about the knowledge and skills we want to instil in graduates to give them a global education (and how will they apply these in any setting) is crucial to a genuine engagement with the world.

Resources:

Griffith University: The GIHE Good Practice Guide to Internationalising the Curriculum

http://www.griffith.edu.au/data/assets/pdf_file/0006/345291/Internationalising-the-Curriculum.pdf

Curriculum Review Tools for QAA – Quality Assurance of Assessment, Part 3 – Assessment for internationalisation of the Curriculum.Duncan D. Nulty, Brona Farreley and Michelle Barker

http://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/344384/Curriculum-Review-Tools-for-QAA-Part-3.pdf

Share your thoughts about a global outlook for students in the comments below!

Integrating library resources into your teaching

Posted by: Grazyna Rosinska, Liaison Librarian (School of Art, School of Media & Communication), RMIT University.

www.facebook.com/rmitlibrary
www.twitter.com/library_rmit
Link to Grazyna’s library subject guides

Last month, June Frost looked at some of the great physical resources and spaces on offer at RMIT and the information skills sessions run by library staff; if you missed it click here. I wanted to continue to look at this idea of developing information skills with a particular focus on just two services that the Library has acquired over the past couple of years, Lynda.com and the Kanopy Streaming Service. Both are available through the RMIT Library homepage through the ‘Databases’ link (or you can search for either as a keyword with our LibrarySearch function) and both provide you with high quality resources that you can link to course content or embed in Blackboard shells to allow easy student access. The real power of each might come from your own explorations and use of the materials though. Hopefully you’ll see uses for both as teaching tools and as professional development resources.

Lynda.com

Click on this link to go to the Lynda link for RMIT staff and students.

Click on this image to go to the Lynda link for RMIT staff and students.

Lynda is a learning platform with thousands of sequenced and indexed videos available to all RMIT staff and students. The focus is on creative, business and technology skills so if you’re looking to start from scratch in a topic or maybe you’re brushing up on the latest version of a piece of software or a web tool, you’ll probably find relevant material on Lynda. Subject areas include:

  • 3D
  • Audio
  • Business including Office and Google software
  • Design
  • Developer
  • Photography and Video
  • Web and social media

One thing that has impressed us in the library is the extensive tagging, time-coding and captioning of content. It means it’s very easy to dip in and find the answer to something. But it’s likely though you’ll stay to learn more as Lynda’s videos are delivered by engaging experts. The login you create with Lynda.com means that you can queue and track the courses you have viewed; you can use it off-campus and be working through a self-directed syllabus. So if we take an example that RMIT staff might be interested in, ‘Gmail for Power Users’, here is the course description:

In this course, Susan Metz shows how to personalize email, manage multiple accounts, and be more productive with the Google email service. The course offers tips and tricks for customizing Gmail to suit your needs; working efficiently with shortcuts; taking advantage of labels; integrating with Calendar, Google Docs, and social media; using voice and video chat; implementing time management in Gmail; and much more…Gmail for Power Users Screenshot

If you look at this course (screenshot at the right) you’ll find there’s a full transcript, and all of those topics with subheadings and the time the instructor spends on each topic. It’s easy to imagine how this could be a valuable self-study tool for staff and students alike.

Kanopy Streaming Service

Another resource that the Library has acquired is the Kanopy Streaming Service. Kanopy supplies audiovisual materials to tertiary institutions in Australia and New Zealand so right away you will be finding materials that have local context and/or local content. Instead of having a film or documentary on closed reserve as we would have done in the past, Kanopy allows high quality documentaries and films (just to give two examples) to be accessed by multiple students from multiple locations.

If you can’t find what you’re looking for there is a recommendation system where you can suggest a title to be acquired for RMIT. The screenshot below for instance shows a 25 minute video on the topic of critical thinking.  These videos can be linked through to your Blackboard shells or you can simply clip the relevant section of a longer piece.  If you’d like more information about Kanopy and Lynda head to Sourcing Online Teaching Materials at the RMIT website.

Screenshot from Kanopy Streaming Service

I hope that this has been useful in surfacing a couple of resources that are proving increasingly popular with academics and students. Don’t forget about the Library Subject Guides as a great starting point for discipline-specific information.

Share your comments about library resources and online materials in the comments below!

Teaching Vietnam-style

Posted by: Rebekha Naim, L&T Group & School of Media and Communication, Design and Social Context College, RMIT.

A bike laden with flowers in Ho Chi Minh City

© Rebekha Naim, 2012

I am teaching professional lighting design and technology to production staff at HTV in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam this week. It is my first experience in a city outside Australia, I cannot understand the language and the culture here is completely foreign to me, however the art of teaching remains the same. As a teacher, I also love learning, so this new experience is, of course, wondrous!

I explain concepts, techniques and the craft of lighting, using diagrams and pictures on Prezi, showing on-line video’s via Clip Grab and using the old-fashioned whiteboard occasionally. I also follow a booklet, which we produced at our client’s request, which has been translated into Vietnamese. I have a very skilled interpreter, so I pause after every few minutes and Kevin repeats my words in Vietnamese. While his English is excellent, he is not a lighting technician and he asks others in the room to help him with industry lingo. The learners have also been asking me many questions via Kevin, which shows their interest and the need for someone like me to train them.

Greg and our Vietnamese interpreter Kevin outside Station HTV9

© Rebekha Naim, 2012

It has also been a real boon having a few lighting TV professionals from HTV in the class with me helping to demonstrate the technology. They efficiently and professionally assist the class to learn about lighting techniques and  also ask me for more detailed information. I am relieved at how easily I am able to teach the basics to some learners and more complex concepts to others at the same time.

The technical HTV staff undertaking this training are not all planning to be lighting technicians. Many are doing the training as they have been asked to by their managers. Their managers are having a break from training and are looking for fresh ideas, approaches and techniques themselves. So I give basic exercises to get beginners up to speed and enjoying themselves, then spend some time with the experienced lighting crew as they show me their equipment and methods and ask for my advice and recommendations. It is a combination of knowledge sharing, analysis and application on a number of levels.

Learners have been patient and supportive of one another and are not as shy as what I was led to believe. If they want to know something, they ask me. If they don’t agree with me, they challenge me. For staff who will never probably touch lighting again, I am teaching them new ideas and concepts, giving them a go at lighting set-ups and an appreciation of lighting techniques, technology and protocol, which will enable them understand the intricacies of lighting for TV, regardless of their role within the company. For the more skilled lighting technicians, I am challenging some of their current methods and approaches, affirming others, and they are networking with colleagues and deepening their knowledge, skills and capabilities.

I am teaching alongside Greg Long, a new teacher and a highly skilled audio consultant and technician (amongst other things). He is teaching the audio aspects of the course. I think he is learning a lot from watching me teach – something that not many new TAFE teachers get the opportunity to do. As I am observing his teaching, it is making me reflect on how I teach and enabling me to offer him some advice too.

Teaching in a foreign country is much easier than I anticipated, as is travelling

Interior shot of one of the studios at HTV9

© Rebekha Naim, 2012

overseas. I found out two weeks ago that I would be here this week so it has been a steep learning curve; luckily I have a wonderful family and superb staff like Shae Allen, who organized my trip; expert advice from well-travelled and supportive colleagues and the support of managers like Simon Embury and Professor Barbara de la Harpe.

The Victorian TAFE system is now operating in dramatically changing seas as we steer our own financial ship with high compliance masts. Stephen Joyce, the Manager of Business Innovation in the TAFE School of Media & Communication, RMIT University and the School’s TAFE Director, Glenn Blair, are actively and very successfully, taking our cutting edge creative media programs to the world. As a 40-year old travel virgin and TAFE teacher, I have taken the challenge to teach overseas and it has been well worth the effort.

The rewards of this venture will be significant, both to HTV and RMIT University. It’s hard to think of a a better fit in terms of alignment to RMIT’s strategic plan of being global, urban and connected.

Well done to Stephen and Glenn for looking beyond our shores and let’s welcome industrious companies from around the world demanding high-level PD for staff company growth and renewal from education experts across the globe.

Share your thoughts about teaching in another culture (or any other aspect of Rebekha’s post) in the comments section below!

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