Category Archives: academic publishing

RMIT’s 2014 Learning and Teaching Expo

Posted by: Meaghan Botterill,  Senior Coordinator, Educational Technology Integration, e-Learning Strategy and Innovation Group, RMIT University.

Click on the image to register for the event.

Click on the image to register for the event.

RMIT’s annual Learning and Teaching Expo is on 2-3 September, 2014. This is a great opportunity to catch up on what is happening both nationally and locally in learning and teaching. Last year the Expo was a great success, so come and join colleagues from across the university to discuss and explore innovative practices that enhance student learning outcomes.

This year’s theme, Designing Teaching, Creating Learning, explores how good teaching design and pedagogical practices create and enhance student learning opportunities and outcomes. There will be an extensive range of speakers, presentations and workshops from across RMIT and the program features the following guests:

  • Professor James Arvanitakis from the University of Western Sydney who was the 2012 Prime Minister’s Teacher of the Year award winner. James’ passion and enthusiasm for teaching is apparent to any of you who have ever seen him present before. He is continually looking for ways to make connections with his students and to make learning relevant, accessible and exciting.
  • Professor Ruth Wallace is the Director of the Northern Institute, at Charles Darwin University. Her particular interests are related to undertaking engaged research that improves outcomes for stakeholders in regional and remote Australia. Ruth has extensive experience in innovative delivery of compulsory, post-school and VE programs in regional and remote areas across Northern Australia.
  • Associate Professor Nicolette Lee is from Victoria University and she is a 2013 OLT National Senior Teaching Fellow. Her project, Capstone curriculum across disciplines, synthesises theory, practice and policy to provide practical tools for curriculum design. It builds on previous and current work in the sector to identify capstone innovations and models-in-use, how standards might be demonstrated through a range of approaches, and providing publicly available and comprehensive practical tools for staff.
  • Associate Professor John Munro is from the University of Melbourne. John’s research, teaching and publications are in the fields of literacy and mathematics learning, and learning difficulties, learning internationally, gifted learning, professional learning and school improvement. His focus on neurology and the brain form the basis of designing explicit teaching strategies to create learning in diverse student cohorts.
This is a great opportunity to learn more about learning and teaching and what we as educators can do to design teaching to create learning and thus enhance student learning outcomes. Registration is essential. The full program and registration form are available here.

Learning and Teaching Expo 

Date: Tuesday 2 and Wednesday 3 September
Time: 9am to 4.30pm
Venue: Storey Hall, Building 16, City campus
Cost: Free

Registration: Essential
Registrations close Wednesday, 27 August 2014.
Register here now.

_________
Find us on:

Social networks at work

Sian Dart, Coordinator, Learning Repository, University Library, RMIT University
Jon Hurford, Senior Advisor, Learning & Teaching, College of Design & Social Context, RMIT University &
Howard Errey, Educational Developer, College of Design & Social Context, 
RMIT University.

yam·mer

verb (used without object)

Watercooler close-up

Are services like Yammer the water coolers of the modern workplace?

1. to whine or complain.
2. to make an outcry or clamour.
3. to talk loudly and persistently.
yammer. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged.

This week’s post is structured a little differently from most tomtom posts…

Sian had already sketched-out her thoughts on Yammer but we also posted a question (on Yammer) to our institution (‘What is Yammer good for?’) and we received over a dozen replies that shaped this post: if you’re in a rush just read the Yammer screen-grabs!

Jon: I was expecting the definition of ‘yammer’ to be much more neutral (meaningless chat?) — surprised that it has this element of complaint.

Sian: Aren’t all social networks used to whine and complain? It’s appropriate! However, I think the most accurate is probably number three, at least for RMIT’s implementation. The small quantity of posters contrasted with a larger number of ‘lurkers’ means that those of us who do post are quite loud and influential on the network, I think.

Howard: It’s not exactly a friendly origin (interesting that it’s related to the German for ‘lamentation’) although perhaps that doesn’t matter — it’s a memorable brand.
What is Yammer? 
For a few years now, Yammer’s been in use at our institution and while it’s the platform that we’ll be talking about in this post, there are many other enterprise-based social platforms that might be in use at your institution or workplace. These include SocialcastSocialtext and Corus — some of these are niche products and they’ll use different organising principles but here’s a quick definition from one of the players in this space, Igloo:
It’s like having your own secure, private version of Facebook, Twitter and Dropbox designed for your business – without the oversharing.
Yammer uses a time-stamped discussion board interface and allows you to broadcast to the entire Catherine and SimonYammer group or to sets of people. You can also follow people which results in their posts being prioritised in your feed. Let’s look at Sian’s thoughts on the platform:
Sian: Here’s my list of ‘Stuff that happens on Yammer’ in no particular order with a quick comment for each.
1. Event promotion
I’m not sure how much take-up arises from these, as opposed to the constant all-staff promotional emails, but it’s good being able to comment on these things instead of just have them broadcast.
2. Self promotion
When staff are getting involved in community events, exhibiting or performing, Yammer is a perfectly valid billboard for potentially interested audiences. The reach is different to putting up a poster in the student union/staffroom, but the intent is the same.
3. Interesting Stuff I Found On the Internet
Like all social media, Yammer is a great place to share, albeit under very obvious filters of ‘safe for work’ and ‘appropriate for work’. (More sensible people than I would point out that all social media should be aimed at that level, for the sake of job safety and future employability!) I encounter a multitude of links every day from my peer learning network, and some of the things I find aren’t necessarily relevant to my work, but I know they’ll be of interest to the RMIT community. And if I know they’re specifically interesting to one person, I can ‘tag’ them and make sure they know about it. Sure, I could just email them the link directly, but who needs more email? And that David and Mattwould stop others serendipitously encountering the article in turn.
4. Private Groups
Yammer provides for private or open groups to be created – for example, we have a Library Staff group, in which we discuss things we think will be of interest mainly to librarians (although it’s astonishing how interested in libraries some of our non-library staff seem to be!).
5. Public Groups
These include the RMIT BUG (Bicycle Users Group) which any Yammer member can join. Joining a group gives you the ability to see the posts from that group and post to it.
6. Help!
Doreen CommentThis is definitely an area where Yammer proves its value. It allows someone to reach out to a community made up of a wide range of staff, and seek expertise, opinion, or understanding of processes within the university. You may not receive an answer, but you might get 10, or you might get the name of someone to contact who could give you an answer — it’s worth a try! I think this service alone, while it does mean you have to admit to potentially all of your colleagues at the entire university that you have a problem, or don’t know something, or need assistance, justifies the staff time spent on Yammer. I love being able to promote a library service, or better yet, the service I run within the library when I have the solution to someone’s specific need. I think it’s way better marketing than a poster or email because it’s direct, targeted and responsive.
7. Networking
I don’t go to too many RMIT events, but every event I’ve been to in the last few years, someone’s introduced themselves and said “I see you on Yammer”. So I guess my name is getting out there after all, it’s a real-name social network – and hopefully it’s mostly good – but each time, I’m reminded that I’ve got more reach than I think I do. (See next: ‘Lurkers’.)
8. Lurking
Well, who knows what these guys get up to. I know they’re there. Every now and again a colleague or a manager will pull me aside and say “Hey, I like what you said there,” or ask me about something I know I’ve only Yammered, despite never seeing them interact with Yammer at all. I guess they must enjoy seeing the discussions, but either kaidaviddon’t have time to interact, don’t have strong opinions, or simply have a fear of putting themselves out there — internet shy!
9. Informal learning and sharing
A lot of useful knowledge is gained via what we learn about each other and what we do in a site like Yammer. By following someone I meet in the Bicycle Users Group I can also get to know about a new part of what happens in the organisation. It’s a bit like walking into the tea room and overhearing or joining in an important work conversation that happens to arise.  Without that informal linking, a lot of useful knowledge remains static.
10. Less email
This has got to be one of the biggest benefits of Yammer. Why send around a bunch of emails when we can all share stuff in a Yammer group? This usage would be particularly helped if line managers used the service effectively. Material is more easily shared into the most appropriate contexts and it also increases transparency.
11. Information filtering
Amy and Sian CommentEver heard the complaint that there is too much information? Yammer-like tools allow us to follow the people who are good at scanning and filtering the information that is most relevant to the organisation. I just need to find and follow some of those useful people rather than try and know everything that is going on myself. Following a few librarians on Yammer can be good for that!
Howard: Agree with the points above and here are two more before we get on to the fine print!
12. Productivity and efficiency
It’s no wonder that Microsoft bought Yammer for $1.2 billion. The primary reason that this type of tools gets adopted in organisations and institutions is the way it improves the bottom line with faster and easier work practices. It probably saves some paper too.

13. Modelling Collaborative Learning
In online learning environments we want our students to be work collaboratively — we can better help them do this if we practice what we preach. Yammer provides a powerful reminder of the way that collaboration can be harnessed to improve engagement, learning and enjoyment.

The Disadvantages 
Yammer type tools need support from above to really succeed. This includes both setting the example and leading organisational and cultural change, to adopt whichever social intranet is chosen. Yammer itself is very easy to get started in that it can organically start without any formal adoption or support. This is also problematic in that important information (either for reasons of IP or other legal sensitivities) can end up with Yammer — and it can be costly to get it back out. So collaboration on sensitive issues needs to be considered and it helps if there is a clear usage policy. Yammer can also be expensive compared with the David Ralternatives.

The Alternatives
Tools like SocialcastSocialtext and Corus can work at least as well as Yammer and have the advantage of being completely contained social intranets; they exist only on the company servers, so there is no question of locating the data. The free version we use of Yammer for instance prevents us from one of the collaboration opportunities that might be most fruitful — the use of the system with our colleagues in Vietnam and other RMIT locations around the world. 

Corus has the added advantage of being applicable for education contexts, having been designed with education in mind, and has already been used in a couple of large scale activities with RMIT students.

Jon: Picking up on couple of points from Sian and Howard, a lot of the discussion here seems to run parallel to the problems we have with students’ engagement in Learning Management Systems:
As educators we’d probably like to see students interacting on a discussion board in Blackboard rather than in a Facebook group that we’re not aware of and not invited into…we’d like students who might have accepted an offer but aren’t due to arrive on campus for another couple of months to be able to sign into a social platform and begin building those links, and even to begin learning (or teaching their peers)…we’d like the kind of mentoring opportunities that could happen between years, between programs, between campuses in a system that could hold student work in shareable portfolios…
Because we’re all split between a number of services and workflows, is Yammer (or something like it) the right match for Google’s suite of apps? I’ll continue to use Yammer to promote this blog and upcoming events but I think this is only the beginning of a different style of work that we’re in the middle of. I’ll leave it to Sian to sign off with some concluding thoughts.

Sian: A tentative conclusion…

If your institution has signed up for Yammer, you simply go to yammer.com and sign in — you’ll automatically get to the right network, because you’ll be authorised by the domain on your email address. If your institution isn’t involved yet, anyone can start it up — but getting people to use it can take a bit more work.

HowardThe Library holds internal training sessions every now and then on Yammer (What is it? Why should I use it? How do I use it?) and Yammer of course suggests we invite colleagues every time we log in to the website, so I guess it grows virally — but having said that, it’s not for everyone. Some staff remain uncomfortable with aspects of sites like Yammer, just as people have different relationships with services like Facebook and Twitter.

So it is what you make it. Some institutions have very active involvement at the Executive level; it’s a way that they can keep in touch with day to day things happening in the business. And it’s only natural that some groups and users will be more active than others. I’ve talked about the Library group because I can see it, but there’s a lot more going on than what I see.

The main thing is, everyone has a voice. It’s more accessible than the official channels (like email and RMIT Update — though these obviously have their place) and it’s for everyone, regardless of rank or role.

Thanks to Catherine, Simon, David G, David R, Matt, Doreen, Amy & Kai for allowing us to republish their comments from Yammer.

Share your thoughts about Yammer in the comments section! Or on Yammer!


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Publishing your teaching: disseminating practice for continual improvement

Posted by:
Dallas Wingrove, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching & Miranda Francis, Liaison Librarian, School of Property, Construction & Project Management, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University.

Students on campus at RMIT.Once the marking period is over and results are lodged, there is thankfully at least some time to catch your breath and begin to allocate a sustained period of time to your research and publications.

Understandably, teachers and lecturers frequently plan to use the non-teaching period for their research and writing, commonly focused on their discipline. Yet, for a range of reasons, fewer write about their teaching practice.

Whilst many feel confident to research and publish from within their discipline, with the exception of those from within the discipline of Education, writing about your teaching might seem daunting, less familiar and for some, it may not even be on the radar.

So, how can your university support you to engage with the learning and teaching literature?

At RMIT, your Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching (SALT) and Liaison Librarians are publishing within this field and can provide you with practical support and direct you to a suite of useful resources.

Our Library offers a range of practical, up-to-date resources which include two key subject guides: one on publishing your research and the second on resources for Learning and Teaching:

Publishing your ResearchStudents at work at RMIT.

http://rmit.libguides.com/publishingresearch

Online Resources for Learning and Teaching
http://rmit.libguides.com/learningandteaching

Beyond accessing these resources, each School in this university has a Liaison Librarian. Liaison Librarians are subject specialists. They can help you to use these resources to find relevant, accurate information.
http://www.rmit.edu.au/library/librarians

In addition, your Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching can also provide advice on current thinking and research and can also provide feedback to support you to reflect on your teaching practice. SALTs can also guide you through the ethics approval process and may also collaborate with you to co-author a paper.

Research in Learning and Teaching

Research into your teaching practice can include course and program assessment, action research and peer feedback on teaching. Your research can encompass professional development, such as how you can enhance your teaching expertise. It may also encompass the study and implementation of pedagogy such as active learning and problem based learning.

Research methods may include reflection and analysis, interviews with your students and focus groups, questionnaires and surveys, content analysis, observational research and case studies.

Importantly, you can also integrate current and emerging research developments from within your discipline into your teaching practice, such as through assessments, face to face and online teaching. The practice of gathering meaningful student feedback will not only enable you to write up your practice, but also offers a vital data source to inform your review of curriculum for improvement.

Areas to consider writing about based on your teaching include:

  • Reflecting on new ways of working/a  change in practice

  • Reflecting on feedback from your students

  • Reporting and evaluating your assessment design

  • Utilising new learning spaces

  • Offshore teaching

  • Integrating teaching, students’ learning and work

  • Teaching /Research Nexus

  • HDR supervision

  • Peer Partnerships

  • Transition

  • English Language Development

  • Cross Disciplinary Teaching

  • Team Teaching

  • Technologies to enhance learning

  • Teaching-Industry partnerships

Where to next?

For those of you who are contemplating dipping your toe in the water, or for the more experienced researchers  in learning and teaching, we hope you may consider taking the time to review these resources and to share these with your peers.

Each College at RMIT also provides a range of support and professional development activities for staff to research and publish, so check with your Deputy Head Research to find relevant support staff and resources.

Writing about your teaching practice delivers many benefits which can also apply to preparing for a teaching award or for the academic staff promotion process.

As teachers, you bring to the table your practical experience and commitment to quality teaching and learning.

So, why not use your experience and knowledge and write about your practice?

In doing so, you will not only disseminate your work and produce outputs but you will further enhance your teaching practice.

Share your thoughts about writing about your own practice in the comments and remember that you can also follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/teachingtomtom

Procrastination

Posted by: Meredith Seaman, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University. 

Academics can sometimes hold very negative perceptions of students as lazy and question their ability to meet deadlines and submit assignments on time. Academics can even be a bit gleeful in their enthusiasm in coming up with rules and penalties for late submission. Reinforcing deadlines is critical if we are trying to teach students about the realities of the workforce, but can’t we all relate to students who struggle with time management or procrastination? If we’re being honest, don’t we all struggle with deadlines and more specifically procrastination on difficult tasks like writing articles? I’ve noticed for myself that writing can prompt anxieties and very similar avoidance strategies that I had sadly practised back as a student. Of course, very real issues including illness, unrealistic goals and workloads get in the way, but we’re also all well aware of a host of procrastination techniques in ourselves and observed in others.

I surveyed colleagues and friends to find out a bit more about how they procrastinate and whether they have any useful (online) tools or strategies that might help them avoid procrastinating. Finally I begin to consider how we might better support students to stop procrastinating and submit on time.

I wonder if procrastination needs much introduction…

I don’t know if there is anyone who doesn’t sometimes procrastinate. For me, when procrastinating, I go to the internet and social media tools. The most mundane of internet games and the worst of television shows all take on new importance. Research has demonstrated that technologies can similarly tempt students to procrastinate and it shouldn’t surprise us that they’ve also demonstrated links between Facebook and procrastination.

Yet it isn’t a new phenomenon

I used to bake cookies before Facebook and iPads, Candy Crush and Pinterest. I have the recipe written down in my recipe book as “procrastination cookies”. So a Facebook restriction will result in other types of procrastination. Cooking, cleaning, sleeping… — Erica

file000184731991

Before the internet, as my friend Erica says, there was cleaning and baking. Tax returns might even get done if avoiding writing or marking papers. If these can be kept in hand, tasks (like setting up a conducive working space) can be appropriate precursor activities before sitting down to get through some marking for instance. Many people have rituals they have to go through before sitting down to work.

In ‘Waiting for the motivation fairy’ Hugh Kearns and Maria Gardiner (2011) also remind us that procrastination can be ‘far more subtle, and can even be taken for productive work’ such as digging up elusive references, starting new projects or experiments, chasing up elusive but perhaps unnecessary references, checking emails.

Is it necessarily a bad thing?cleaning

We certainly need breaks. Breaks are essential for deep thinking and assimilation of ideas and concepts, critical for creativity, to occur. Walking, gardening or other simple repetitive tasks not taking much concentration can help the creative process. Productive and creative ‘types’ throughout history have often taken dramatic steps to increase their productivity and avoid procrastination, some common elements include daily set periods of work, clear targets of how many words to achieve, but they also had breaks such as time out for day jobs and long walks.

It’s important to think about why you might be procrastinating and not be too judgemental or hard on yourself:

Reward yourself for work done. Punishment never works, it just creates more procrastination. Sometimes laughing helps to, to take the pressure off: I love PhD comics. Oh, and getting to know the difference between avoiding because you’re lazy, and avoiding because you’re actually on the brink of a brainwave… — Lisa

I think the unconscious aspects of self sabotage often need to be addressed carefully rather than becoming stentorian with oneself… — Fiona

Sometimes we may just be stuck on something or need to approach a different way. Other times a task may be overwhelming or crippling, and strategies are needed to address the procrastination.

filing

Are there any solutions?

One colleague successfully uses Pomodoro as her procrastination avoidance tool. In brief, it’s a pre-set strict period of work, using a timer, where interruptions are carefully managed with breaks interspersed. Another finds it really useful to get up very early in the morning at the same time each day to write. The lack of interruptions and being a bit less awake may actually be a benefit to productivity in his case. Some people have joined support networks such as “Shut up and Write” where interested people meet at a cafe and write in short bursts and then have a chat to each other as well.

Kearns and Gardiner identify three techniques which provide a good summary of key practices to hold procrastination at bay:

1) big projects need to be broken down into steps (perhaps even tiny ones)

2) set a time deadline by which to perform that tiny step

3) build in an immediate reward.

Implications for assessment design

If we think about assessment design in the context of the conditions that may contribute to procrastination, then as academics, we would want to avoid setting unclear tasks; tasks without any progress points or milestones and tasks that feel too big and complex to get started. They may all affect student motivation and their ability to make a start. If ‘action leads to motivation, which in turn leads to more action’ (Kearns and Gardiner, 2011) then designing assessment that encourages students to get started makes sense. So think about breaking up some big assessments into smaller components with earlier due dates to get students started and on the right track. Provide them with feedback, early on. Even better: work with your students to help them to break up the assessment tasks. Also, think about rewards versus the perceived ‘threat’ or pressures associated with assessment tasks.

coffeeIf redesigning your assessment for the next semester seems like a big task at the moment, don’t put it off! Break it down, set some dates and reward yourself!

Thanks to Fiona Collins, Lisa Farrance and Erica Walther for their input into this post.

References and more information:

Share your thoughts and strategies in the comments!


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RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo 2013

Guest post: Penny Mercer, Project Advisor, Learning and Teaching Unit, RMIT University.

Click to open the RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo 2013 page.

The Learning and Teaching Expo is an opportunity to showcase the excellent work of our dedicated teaching staff. It is a time for all of us to reflect on how we might enhance the student experience, reimagine our teaching and network with colleagues.

This year’s Expo takes the theme of “Inspiring teaching, inspiring learning.” Come along and hear what your colleagues have done to improve student learning outcomes, bring along your own experiences, or questions for discussion time. The Expo eLearning journey will allow all staff to identify a point of interest from which further learning opportunities can be explored.

Come along and hear from our invited keynote speakers about what is happening in the tertiary education sector, hear what your colleagues have done to improve student learning outcomes and bring along your own experiences or questions for discussion time.

Day 1: Tuesday 3 September – 12pm to 4.30pm, with lunch from 1pm to 2pm
Day 2: Wednesday 4 September – 9am to 1pm, with lunch from 1pm to 2pm
Venue: Design Hub, City campus.

Click here (or on the image above) to see the 2013 program and register now to attend (RMIT login required).

We look forward to seeing you there!

Visiting guests and noting opportunities

A photography lecture in 1947

Melbourne Technical College 1947. (cc) RMIT University Archives Image Collection

Posted by: Megan McPherson, L&T Group, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT.

One of the pleasures of being connected with a university is the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers presenting at different forums and for different audiences.

There are some great visiting professors coming to speak over the next few weeks; Anthony Paré and Helen Sword just to name two this week: Wednesday and Friday respectively- click here to register!

On 8 November 2012, Professor Erica McWilliam, Adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology, spoke at the RMIT College of Business Research Showcase in the Swanston Academic Building. Her audience was mainly comprised of research students in the College of Business involved in higher degrees by research, however her discussion was relevant to any one involved in knowledge creation and learning and teaching.

Professor McWilliam’s presentation was about scholarship and the discomfort of being involved in research that is challenging and new.

A few of the many ideas Professor McWilliam discussed were:

  • The three simple questions that she uses to define her research area:  What’s going on? How do you know? And So What? Twenty-first century researchers know that there are creaks and leaks in knowledge creation; it is how you, as a researcher, position yourself in relation to these three questions which is relevant.
  • What counts as a field? McWilliam suggests Robin Rogers’ notion of twenty-first century researchers operating in a tessellated field and our ability to collaborate, as networks and nodes, changes the way we think of discipline boundaries. Twenty-first century researchers need to be able to tolerate the discomfort of working not in one field or discipline, but being crossdisciplinary, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary. Check out the Research Whisperer’s post for detailed discussion of these terms.
  • Twenty-first century researchers creating trouble for what she called ‘straight thinking’, questioning how we design research, using patterns rather than straight lines. McWilliam used Gosling’s The Knight’s Move as the metaphor; see her keynote speech to the 3rd Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference (The Knight’s Move: its relevance for educational research and development, 2009).

The McWilliam keynote was twittered on the day by @kyliebudge, @thesiswhisperer and @MeganJMcPherson with the hashtag #mcwilliam. Using Twitter in a lecture presentation is a form of active note taking. It’s also a way to practice writing short, sharp summaries of bigger ideas. Anthony Paré describes this as a type of heuristic writing to make sense; and to make meaning and knowledge. The tweets start to make a narrative of the event, and the results can be both a record and a prompt to do further work with the information.

The Twitter notes have been useful to connect me with information and to network with others. I found the other keynotes referenced here and Kylie Budge (@kyliebudge) found McWilliam’s article ‘From school to café…’ and posted it to Twitter. The notes have been interesting for networking in academic circles; I had great questions and supportive comments in my Twitter feed from academics from different countries and from within Australia.

Thanks to @thesiswhisperer and  @kyliebudge for tweeting at the presentation in the room and all others who contributed to the #mcwilliam feed. Professor McWilliam’s Twitter handle is @elmcwilliam.

You can use tools like Storify.com and  SnapBird.org to look at and collate the tweets from hashtags. When the College of Business has the video finalised, we will provide a link here too!

References / Further Reading:

Judge, A (2012) Insights from Knight’s move thinking, accessed 18 Nov, 2012

McWilliam, E (2009) The Knight’s Move: Its relevance for educational research and development. Keynote paper presented at the 3rd Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference, Singapore. Accessed 18 Nov, 2012.

Click here for slides from the above keynote.

Paré, A. (2009) What we know about writing, and why it matters. Compendium 2, 2(1), Dalhousie University. Accessed 18 Nov, 2012

Thomson, P (2012) Academic travel diary: a narrative to find the way. Accessed 18 Nov, 2012

Share your thoughts about getting the most value from conferences and visiting guests in the comments!

RMIT Learning & Teaching Expo Preview

Guest Post by Diana Cousens, Senior Advisor, Learning and Teaching Unit, RMIT.

Opens a link to the program for RMIT's Learning & Teaching Expo 2012

Click on the nautilus shell see the full program!

Transforming the Learning Experience is the theme of RMIT’s Learning and Teaching Expo this year. Held over four mornings from 27 August to Thursday 30 August 2012, the Expo will host speakers and offer seminars and workshops of national relevance to the higher education and also VET sectors.

Each morning is dedicated to a particular specialisation in learning and teaching and includes speakers and practitioners from RMIT, other universities and important members of organisations such as TEQSA and OLT (formerly ALTC). With the theme of Transforming the Learning Experience it is an opportunity for all of us to reflect on how we might enhance the student experience and re-imagine our teaching using a range of innovations including our new learning spaces and RMIT’s global presence.

Come along and hear from our invited keynote speakers about what is happening in the tertiary education sector, hear what your colleagues have done to improve student learning outcomes and bring along your own experiences or questions for discussion time.

The Expo runs from 9.00 to 1.00 with lunch from 1.00 to 2.00.

You could also win an iPad! You’ll be in the running for an iPad just by filling out a short feedback sheet.

Register to attend at: http://www.rmit.edu.au/teaching/expo(RMIT login required).

Date: Monday, 27 August – Thursday 30 August

Venue: Storey Hall and Bundoora campuses.

On Monday, Tuesday and Thursday the Expo will be held in the City Campus at Storey Hall and on Wednesday it will be held at the Bundoora Campus.

Day 1: New rules of the game
Monday 27 August
Storey Hall, City campus
Keynote 1: TEQSA and the new regulatory environment
Ms Lucy Schulz
Executive Director, Regulation and Review Group, TEQSA

Keynote 2: AQF, TEQSA and ASQA – Simple acronyms with far reaching consequences
Professor Geoff Crisp
Dean, Learning and Teaching, RMIT

Day 2: Teaching for all
Tuesday 28 August
Storey Hall, City campus
Keynote: Inclusive teaching in Australian higher education: Findings from a national study
Professor Marcia Devlin
Open University Australia

Day 3: Access all areas
Wednesday 29 August
Building 224, Bundoora campus
Keynote: An Education ‘In’ Facebook
Professor Matthew Allen
Head of Department, Internet Studies, Curtin University

Day 4: Engaging globally
Thursday 30 August
Storey Hall, City campus
Parallel Sessions with Vietnam – Saigon South & Hanoi
David DeBrot
Landon Carnie
Chi Le Phuong
Kieran Tierney
Minh Nguyen Duc
RMIT Vietnam

We look forward to seeing you there!

eBooks and Twitter: from L&T to research

Posted by: Rebekha Naim, School of Media and Communication, RMIT University.

This is from a presentation given at the monthly teachers@work, L&T seminars, School of Media and Communication, RMIT University.

Establish your reputation by publishing online and watch it go viral!

self-portrait with portable devices © Jenny Weight: geniwate.com

© Jenny Weight: geniwate.com

When Jenny Weight, lecturer in Media and Communications and post-graduate supervisor, grabs her laptop, tablet or smart phone she does extraordinary things. At a teachers@work session she showed us how. She links her research which is published online to her Twitter account. This then becomes ‘live’ research as she uses the tweets to further inform her work.

Jenny teaches in the area of networked and convergent media at both graduate and post-graduate level in the School of Media and Communication, RMIT. Her recent research has focussed on the sociology of media device use in the area of pedagogy and networked media.

She uses iBooks and eBooks in combination with Twitter as a way of researching, teaching and disseminating her research.

Jenny publishes her research on Apple’s iBooks format which can include video, audio and interactive media, making it a richer experience for students.

Being on the cutting-edge means that not everything is perfect. The current reality is the iBooks store approval process is time consuming and learning the layout software is complex. Also, not all of the students are able to read the work so a pdf version is necessary.

However Jenny got canny! She now publishes the pdf files on her blog then advertises them via twitter to a ‘doco research’ hashtag (#), each created specifically for that research. When Jenny first did this, her research took on a life of its own – some retweeted, others blogged, still others scooped it, and before she knew it, Jenny Weight’s blog page had 20 000 hits!

Inspired? Want to know more? Please have a look at Jenny’s presentation. She would love to hear from you: http://geniwate.com/?p=2621

A writing challenge – the first AcBoWriMo has been announced

The following post is by guest contributor Dr Narelle Lemon. Narelle works in Arts Education in Teacher Education programs within the School of Education, RMIT University in Melbourne. Narelle is 17 months post doctoral thesis and just beginning to write again and put into practice what she has learnt from this experience. She tweets @rellypops

Image via Ted_Major.

Life at university is a constant juggle – it is dealing with students, writing curriculum, teaching, researching, administration and pastoral care. Now, in Australia at least, the teaching is done, the marking is almost complete and an academic’s mind can turn to thoughts of research and writing and in the distance, publishing.

Yesterday was the 1st November and with that comes a month’s supply of tea and chocolate, washed trackies, slippers, favorite music blaring from the stereo, and an assortment of cafes selected that are conducive for writing. I have been preparing for November, like Triple J and their Australian Music Month – planning, preparing, inviting and motivating others, inquiring, and most of all thinking.  A writing challenge has been set and I, along with several friends and colleagues have signed-up for the first AcBoWriMo. As academics busy most of the year with teaching, many of us are now winding down that part of our work and dedicating an entire month to writing.

November is hereby declared the first Academic Book Writing Month or AcBoWriMo. Created by @PhD2Published , and the organizer and co-participant @charlottefrost, AcBoWriMo takes its inspiration from  National Novel Writing Month or  NaNoWriMo the spin is that instead of writing a novel, we are writing for an academic audience and can be flexible in terms of where our total word count goes –  journals, book chapters, books, doctoral thesis, or academic reviews that we just haven’t got around to. The challenge also establishes itself for one to learn how to be a writer, to learn what it means to be a writer, and to set this as a focus in order to succeed in producing writing that shares your ideas, research and message.

In taking up this challenge, AcBoWriMo is igniting explicit thinking and action about a writing task. So if you are taking up the challenge, or thinking about joining in, here are some tips for approaching this new approach to learning how to write and share your research.

1. Write about something you are passionate about. This excitement will support those moments during November when resistance to this project come into play.

2. @charlottefrost recommends a decision needs to be made ‘upon a target word count and to try and make this something that would really push you beyond anything you ever thought possible’. The challenge has been set for 50,000 words in a month – ‘for an academic this could be a challenge but one that allows for a stepping up that could result in some amazing output’. But in setting a target you also need to be honest about what could be and can be achievable for you, so go for a lesser target if that is more achievable for you.

3. Look at your diary and block out time each day so you can meet this word total. If you want to work 5 days a week, with a total of 22 days dedicated to writing, then you are aiming for approximately 2, 273 words a day. But if you are like many, and want to write on the weekend as well then you have the focus of 1,666 words a day. @charlottefrost recommends for those who want to focus on thisbit of a nutty goal for academic writing in one month’ that it ‘works out at something like 2,500 words a day’. I have gone through the entire month and dedicated full days (hopefully for extra words) and blocks of time so I can set myself up to succeed in this project. I’ve learnt from my doctoral writing times that I can get easily distracted

4. Plan what you are going to do with your words. For me I’m going to focus on a book proposal I have been thinking about but never find the time to prioritize it amongst my teaching, research and administration tasks. I have set this as my goal plan and have also shared it with a few colleagues who are participating so we have a reference point for checking in on progress.

5. Once decided what your AcBoWriMo project is, create a writing framework and allocate words to sections, and even apply these to subheadings. These guides will assist greatly for the word target and also your own project management for success. As a successful NaNoWriMo author has reported, planning is essential.

6. Invite others to undertake the challenge. Celebrating and learning from each other allows for seeing what others are doing in how they approach writing. This support is a great way to share perspectives on the learning and teaching associated with participating in AcBoWriMo. As has discussed before on this blog, opportunities to learn and to see things from a different perspective leads to discovering some really interesting perspectives.

7. Share your writing successes each day. The Twitter hashtag for AcBoWriMo is already beginning to generate some supportive advice, tips and hints for like minded people. @PhD2Published and @Teachingtomtom are linking fellow writers and are not short of encouragement for challenging your month of learning to be a productive writer.

8. Set yourself a personal learning goal for AcBoWriMo participation. Open yourself up to alternative ways of writing, perhaps even implement some techniques that you haven’t had the chance to yet but would like to try. See how you go for progressing your writing.

9. Spice up your daily writing time. Shutupandwrite sessions often utilize the Pomodoro technique for 25 minutes write, 5 minutes break, followed by 25 minutes writing. If you want some incentives for this, and a tracker who will make your pauses transparent, think about downloading the Pomodoro App for your idevice.

10.  Add some exercise into your plans for writing – chocolate, coffee, and sitting at a computer will add more than words to your achievements in the month of November if some walking, running, cycling or swimming aren’t a part of your regime.

11. Find a place or places where you know you can write, and think about what time of the day works for you. I write well in the morning, and I know which cafés work for me for dedicated productive writing while I enjoy a coffee when I need a change of scenery from my office.

12.  It’s all about words, not about tools. There have has been much debate about tools that can assist in framing your writing (Scrivener has been mentioned a few times via @ThesisWhisperer and @ResearchWhisperer). Repeat NaNoWriMo writers have reported that for the month of November, if you haven’t used these tools before then now is not the time to begin as you end up spending more time trying to work out which one is right for you. I would have to agree with this. I spent several hours looking at the apps available for my iPad and before I knew it I really didn’t have one tool that I could understand its full capacity to support me for my writing. I’m going to suggest noting these possibilities and set December as a month to play and discover for writing.

13.  Start fast and target those word limits each day, and if the words are a flowing let them flow. If daily targets are busted then this allows for some release of pressure on other days.

14.  Work through writer’s block and set yourself the challenge to learn how to ‘blah write’ – just get something down on paper, don’t worry about spelling and grammar at this stage, just write when the ideas flow.

15.  Back up those precious words you have produced, as there is nothing worse (and we all have our horror stories) in losing your writing. This is a great learning curve in approaching all your learning and teaching, and research endeavors.  I have been utalising Dropbox for backing up my writing and for allowing access across multiple computers.

16.  Set a time in December to share your writing with a fellow AcBoWriMo colleague. Co-read and give each other feedback. The month of November has been dedicated to producing an amazing amount of text, so some feedback will be part of the celebration and academic integrity to gain perspective. Hopefully you haven’t lived on coffees to reach your target words, but just in case those fingers have typed overtime, this sharing will allow for some proof reading as well.

As the month progresses it will be fascinating to see where our writing takes us. Who else is up for the AcBoWriMo challenge? Follow and be inspired through Twitter using the #AcBoWriMo hashtag or blog.

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